Faculty of
Languages & Communication

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Annual Report

Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship

General Features of the Courses

The courses in the two departments of  translation, linguistics and literature enable students to study literature, literary criticism and theory, English language, its history, formal and variationist linguistics, expository and creative writing, oral and debate skills, translation, research and project work.

The academic programs of linguistics , literature and translation allow students to deepen their literary taste and aesthetic appreciation through exposure to hundreds of texts that represent the full spectrum of literary genres.  Students are provided with a rich library replete with the latest publications in the various fields of humanities.

Moreover, courses enable students to understand literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts and instill in our students the appreciation for the aesthetic qualities and literary production by exposing them to a diversified curriculum rich in literature.  Through their studies, students will grasp an understanding and knowledge of literary terms, forms and genres; as well as, representative authors and cultural characteristics of major literary historical periods, movements, trends, themes and critical interpretive methods. The syllabus also develops the student's intellectual abilities by focusing on the most current critical approaches related to postmodernism, feminist studies and postcolonial literature.

Moreover, the course work exposes our students to some diversified curriculum rich in linguistics, paralinguistic and language skills.  In studying courses of linguistics and language, students will develop critical thinking, reading and communication skills. Students will be endowed with the linguistic, critical and intellectual skills which stem from the culture and literature that is historically tied to the English language.  Knowledge and understanding of basic concepts in analyzing discourse will be discussed and analyzed. Language proficiency will be taught to allow students to distinguish grammatical and ungrammatical sentences; to appreciate the functioning of rules and constraints; as well as, relate syntactic information to first language and second language acquisition.

The Faculty updates curriculum yearly in order to ensure an up-to-date understanding of global issues.  Instructors ensure that they reach all students in heterogeneous classrooms by the use of a variety of techniques and teaching methods.  Moreover, it provides a rich syllabus required to obtain proficient skills in literature, linguistics, translation and writing; while also enhancing the students’ listening, oral, pronunciation, grammar and critical thinking.  The Faculty follows a sustainable process that provides the students with growth in a sequenced, step-by-step approach.  It is a diversified and fertile environment that will enable students to grow in knowledge and confidence throughout their University studies.  Continued, spiraled reinforcement skills are taught throughout the syllabus to ensure understanding and application of all necessary proficiency in their field of study.

These courses are designed to equip students with the competence needed to fulfill their academic potential and achieve educational excellence.


Currency and Innovation of Curriculum

A Curriculum Committee set up by each Faculty, comprising of the Dean, Department chairpersons and Faculty members with different specializations, assesses the curricula with respect to local and international external references, skills desired by employers, new trends in the field, and programs offered by other universities.

  • A course review meeting once every semester to see if any amendments are needed to the current courses (based on currency, overlap information by staff, change in human and learning resources), amend elective courses to cover new market needs or covering new areas of knowledge.
  • A program review meeting once every four years to create new programs or to amend current programs depending on student progression, student evaluation (through the utilization of preset questionnaires) and market research (indicating market needs). This will induce preparation/amendment of course files and the compliance with the local and adopted external standards.

The two above cycles will constantly ensure the currency and the quality of the curricula. Hence, students registered and/or joining the faculties are assured that they will be taught up-to-date and carefully selected courses, embedded in modern program layouts and consistently delivered regardless of lecturer.


Teaching, Learning, and Assessment

Modes

The  mode of teaching employed in the Departments is both lectures and student centered. In certain occasions, external speakers are invited by the University and some staff members to provide a practical view of divergent topics relevant to the English language and literature. In Translation major, all graduating students are required to undertake field training which involves working in close contact with local companies and communities, putting into practice what the students have learned over the previous three years of their program. The benefit of this method is that students work in groups and develop the necessary communication skills needed and sought by employers.  Additionally, a graduating project—which is a compulsory requirement—enhances many skills in students.  First, it capitalizes on the complementarity of the three learning domains of the cognitive, the psychomotor and the affective in building students’ skills.  Second, it creates the civic engagement of students as the graduation project requires building a synergy and relevance between the society and the academic endeavors.  Last but not least, it boosts the research methodology, tools and information management skills of students.

Although the dominant assessment mode is the traditional written exams, staff members are encouraged to use innovative and creative modes of assessment. Assessment methods are chosen according to course objectives and aims as stated in the description document. This includes the use of exams, assignments, essays, presentations, case studies, problem solving, simulation, research writing, research assistance and progression meetings. These assessment methods vary from one course to another depending on the specific nature of each course. Some courses rely on assignments or projects, while others rely on exams to measure extent to which the stated objectives have been accomplished.  The distribution of marks of each course is as follows: 30% for the Midterm, 10% participation, 10% project and 50% on the final exam.


Course Files

Each course has a course file with the sections listed below (as deemed appropriate):

  • Course Content Description Summary
  • Course Content Description Details
    • Course syllabus
    • Course description
    • Course objectives
    • External references
    • Evaluation and assessment criteria
    • References, textbooks and supporting material
    • Course schedule (lecture by lecture topics listings)

The Course Content Description Summary document that specifies the course description, objectives, evaluation and assessment criteria, references, textbooks and supporting material, and the course schedule, is distributed to the students during the first week of lectures. Additionally, lecture notes, assignments, practice exercises, previous exams, related projects, web-based information instructions and related details are made available to students.


Examination

The University's guidelines state that student assessment must be based on one Midterm (usually worth 30% of the student's overall grade) and a final exam (worth 50%).  Projects (worth 10%), and participation through take home exams, reader-response essays and presentations are (worth 10%).


Description of Pedagogics

Students are evaluated through term papers, presentations, reading responses, classroom activities and discussions, exams, take home exams, quizzes, projects and class participation.

It is imperative to naturally champion the teaching pedagogy that grows horizontally and vertically and which inspires students and does not intimidate, motivates and does not dictate, helps students to express and does not suppress, exposes students to knowledge and does not impose, encourages interaction and does not intimidate, creates student-centered and not student-centrifugal classes. We strive in the faculty to implement the necessary teaching techniques to achieve these goals.


Description of learning pedagogy

In a course of literature, students are provided with a selection of major world writers and their literary works from modern period to the present and are exposed to different literary, cultural, and historical texts.  The teaching approach is historical, political, social, but mostly literary.  The chronological arrangement of the selected texts is intended to help students develop contextual and analytic notes and commentary.  One of the primary aims of the course is to allow the students to come to terms with the process through which literature has been shaped by history and specific political and socio-economic contexts as much as history has been shaped by culture and one of its basic components:  Literature.  Thus, the intricate and complex interrelationship between texts and contexts are emphasized.  Exposed to works, each presenting major literary techniques and analytical trends, students are provided with bases of study of further works.  The necessary background of each text is offered to enable students to read and appreciate literature in its meaningful context.   It offers a comparative study of representative texts in world literature from early twentieth century onwards, focusing on the genre of the short story in world literature.  The focus balances between the vertical approach (intrinsic close reading) and the horizontal (extrinsic) approach.  Speed is required, but deep analysis of issues is also required.  Students’ presentations on major ideas, issues, definitions, and schools of thought are encouraged.

In the listening and speaking, students were required to create a “Sustainable Humane City”, making students aware of environmental, social and global issues.  Presentations, reports, models, skits, etc. were used for final presentation.

In writing classes, portfolios are maintained by students of all their written work for articles and materials related to the course and their graded papers.

Reader response theory is applied to discussions.  Instructor encourages and expects to hear how the student, the reader, interacts with the readings.  All thoughtful opinions and insights are valued and welcomed.

In order to help collect thoughts, and home in on student’s critical and analytical skills, students are required to write response papers focusing on any work or any aspect of a text.  Responses are expected to be thoughtful and well-presented.

Students become familiar with the basic concepts of discourse analysis.  Stretches of language beyond the sentence are looked at and investigated in an effort to see how they come to be meaningful to the language user.  The overarching goal of this course is to equip the student with what is necessary to understand, interpret and critique pieces of discourse thoroughly and correctly.  Students are expected to contribute much of the in-class discussion on the relevant data. Topics such as cohesion, coherence, conversation structure, speech act theory and conversational maxims are dealt with.

 For our student internship program and graduation projects, we have professors who supervise students. In addition, students are also required to prepare a portfolio of internship work done and a portfolio of various drafts of the graduation projects. 


Objectives

  • Provide quality active learning in English Language, Literature and translation so that graduates will have a good command of both spoken and written English as well as a solid foundation in English Literature and Linguistics.
  • Provide students with excellent preparation for advanced studies in Linguistics, translation and English Literature.
  • Prepare students to be competitive in the job market locally, regionally and internationally.

Goals

The goal of the Faculty of Languages and Communication at AUM is to provide high-quality education that prepares graduates for successful professional practice and advanced studies through interactive and experiential learning.


Learning Outcomes

On completion of the chosen degree students will:

  • Have the required linguistic and literary knowledge to understand and appreciate various types of text and/or the required theoretical and practical competence in translation as per their chosen degree.
  • Be able to employ free, critical and innovative thinking and analyze and critique different texts.
  • Have the required foundation to pursue potential future careers in teaching, translation and/or interpretation as per their chosen degree.
  • Be able to pursue advanced studies, conduct research and engage in continuing professional development.
  • Have acquired the skills to be team players and assume leadership roles.

The BA degree will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily demonstrated

  • The ability to apply knowledge of language, linguistics and literature or translation.
  • Linguistic, literary, communicative and critical thinking skills to address competently issues relevant to their field of study.
  • The ability to apply current practices that will lead to lifelong learning.
  • Ethical standards required to compete in a local/global market.

Bachelor programs:

English Language and Literature and Translation.

  1. Bachelor of Arts in English Language and Literature

The aim of the Bachelor of Arts in English Language and Literature is to:

  • Provide quality active learning in English Language and Literature so that graduates will have a good command of both spoken and written English as well as a solid foundation in English Literature and Linguistics.
  • Provide students with excellent preparation for advanced studies in Linguistics and English Literature.
  • Prepare students to be competitive in the job market locally, regionally and internationally.
  • Provide quality active learning in English Language and Literature so that graduates will have a good command of both spoken and written English as well as a solid foundation in English Literature and Linguistics.
  • Provide students with excellent preparation for advanced studies in Linguistics and English Literature.
  • Prepare students to be competitive in the job market locally, regionally and internationally.

 

Description of the academic programs: epistemological cores and intended learning outcomes:

Fields

1

Literature and Criticism

2

Linguistics and translation

3

Language

Subjects

1

Literature and Criticism

Fiction.Poetry.Drama.Periods and Schools of Literature.

2

Linguistics and translation

Syntax.Morphology.Phonetics and Phonology.Semantics.Introduction to Language.  Theories of interpretation and translation

3

Language

Reading Comprehension.Listening.Speaking.Vocabulary.Grammar.

Core Competencies

1

1- Literature and Criticism

 

1. Analysis and interpretation

 

2. Analysis of literary texts in terms of genres, elements of literary texts such as character, characterization, plot, setting, point of view, style, and figures of speech.

 

3. Knowledge of literary schools and movements.

 

 

4. Recognition of the styles of literary schools and movements.

 

 

5. Knowledge of the theories of literary criticism and their applications.

 

2

2- Linguistics and Translation

 

1. Knowledge of main concepts in linguistics and translation in addition to the various types of grammar.

 

2. Recognition of speech sounds in terms of their articulation, pronunciation, interpretation and quality.

 

 

3. Knowing the definition of a morpheme, its types, and kinds of morphology and word formation.

 

 

4. Knowledge of Phrase Structure Grammar and Transformational-Generative Grammar and their respective roles, analysis of sentences syntactically and rule ordering.

 

5. Knowledge of lexical semantics, lexical relations, idioms, ambiguity, etc.

 

3

3- Language

 

1. Reading Comprehension passages.Observing various reading skills such as inference and reference.

 

2. Knowing the meaning of various words and their use to complete sentences.

 

3. Knowledge of various topics in grammar including verbs, nouns, pronouns, conjunctions, clauses and phrases.

 Descriptive academic program Intended Learning Outcomes


Literature and Criticism

 

A. Knowledge & Understanding

Upon successful completion of the program students will be able to:

A1.

Acquire a basic knowledge about poetry, recognize the particular qualities and techniques inherent in poetry and display a good command of poetic devices often used by poets.

A2.

Demonstrate an understanding of the short story as a literary genre, comprehend and appreciate literary works and be acquainted with the various elements of the works of fiction.

A3.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the authors and their representative texts, demonstrate understanding of the philosophies and schools of thought prevalent in different periods and demonstrate thorough comprehension of both the intellectual, cultural climate and social milieu through comprehension of the history of English literature.

A4.

Analyze literary texts, understand all matters of form and content, understand and differentiate between and among the various schools of fiction, demonstrate knowledge of the key elements of fiction, demonstrate knowledge of the general milieu, draw parallels between and among literary texts, move away from memorization, appreciate fiction as a form of art, relate to human situations depicted in fiction, develop a global perspective on art and life and appreciate cultural, racial and ethnic diversity.

A5.

Understand key terms such as tragedy, comedy, the theatre of the absurd and movements as Realism, Expressionism, and Experimentation in drama.  Understand the basic elements of drama: plot, character and dialogue. Understand playwright’s objectives and techniques.

A6.

Digest then grasp the major concepts and features of both Romantic and Victorian periods, recognize Romantic or Victorian features in a given text and display a good command of the thought and trends of each period.

A7.

Gain an introductory understanding of Shakespeare’s work and how it fits into his life and times. Understand the characteristics of Shakespearean comedy, tragedy, romance and history.

A8.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the different literary theories. Understand the basic theoretical concepts underlying contemporary approaches to literature and of the major differences among them. Understand the aims of literary criticism; understand key forms and terminology of literary criticism; be able to read the writings of literary scholars and critics with understanding and judicious appreciation. Be acquainted with the methods and materials of literary research; be able to conduct literary research according to established procedures and to use such research effectively and responsibly.

A9.

Digest then grasp the historical, cultural and political backgrounds of American literature, recognize the main features and trends of American literature, and display a good command of and familiarity with the main writers and works.

A10.

Appreciate classical literature as a genre of literature.

A11.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the authors of 20th century literature and their representative texts, demonstrate understanding of the philosophies and schools of thought prevalent in this period, demonstrate a good comprehension of the literary history of the period and demonstrate a good comprehension of both the intellectual climate and social milieu.

A12.

Gain broad knowledge and understanding of postcolonial theory /studies/literature and feminist theory /studies/and literature.

A13.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of some of the major concerns of women’s and feminist studies and be able to examine and connect Anglo-American feminist movements, theories with Arabic and Islamic ones and to delineate the presence of a distinct Arab Islamic feminism.

A14.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of European literature. Be acquainted with the intellectual milieu of the European scene. Form and express critical opinions about the themes and developments in European literature. Be familiar with the major figures of European literature.

 

 

B. Intellectual Skills

Upon successful completion of the program students will be able to:

B1.

Analyze a poem, make distinction among the various devices used in a particular text and develop a critical appreciation of poets’ creations and insights.

B2.

Improve their ability of critical thinking and judgment, discover the meaning of the texts and interpret and evaluate them in different ways.

B3.

Analyze a literary text from the point of view of theme, plot, and characterization. Structure ideas and arguments, both orally and in writing, in a sustained and logical fashion and support them with relevant examples. Differentiate among opinions, intentions and facts. Detect and recognize the style and range of the language used depending upon the social and cultural context in which it is used. Recognize the various literary genres and forms. Be fully acquainted with figurative language in different literary texts. Build up their literary lexicon.

B4.

Appreciate fiction as a form of art, relate to human situations depicted in fiction, develop a global perspective on art and life and appreciate cultural, racial and ethnic diversity.

B5.

Analyze a Romantic or a Victorian literary text and highlight its features. Make distinction among various approaches and styles. Relate the components of a literary work to the main features of the period.

B6.

Be able to talk about literary elements and meaning in Shakespeare’s texts.

B7.

Analyze an American literary text and highlight its features. Make distinction among various approaches and styles. Relate the components of a literary work to the background of each age.

B8.

Analyze a literary text from the point of view of a literary school, generate and articulate personal responses to literary and critical texts, and explain the premises and assumptions underlying such personal responses and write a critical essay that states a clear thesis and supports it persuasively, integrating literary research with personal ideas.

B9.

Trace and evaluate different themes, attitudes and styles as seen in literature during different periods of the golden aged literature. Discuss theoretical approaches in classical literature.

B10.

Identify the features of postcolonial and feminist theories and differentiate between various feminisms.

B11.

Identify postmodernism both as a cultural attitude and as a literary movement, some of the ideas and attitudes came to be associated with the postmodern condition and with key concepts such as ideology, irony, deconstruction, metafiction, metanarratives, and simulacrum, key postmodern thinkers such as Baudrillard and Lyotard.

 

 

C. Subject-Specific Skills

Upon successful completion of the program students will be able to:

C1.

Show a good command of the poetic devices used in poetry, recognize various levels of language, closed and open forms used in poetry and understand how poets cast their perspectives of human experience into an organic art form.

C2.

Read and understand a variety of short stories related to different periods of time, identify and analyze the various elements of fiction as reflected in the texts, interpret the different themes in the texts and relate them to relevant issues.

C3.

Determine how literary texts are impacted by context whether cultural, historical, or political. Perceive affinities and continuities within a certain period and other earlier periods.

C4.

Show a good grasp of the Romantic concepts and features, display understanding of the major works of Romantic and Victorian literature; compare and contrast the features of each period.

C5.

Write about Shakespeare’s work and read and understand Shakespeare through close reading, analysis and application of various critical approaches.

C6.

Show a good grasp of the predominant trends in American literature, and display understanding of the major works of American literature

C7.

Determine how literary texts are impacted by context whether cultural, historical or political and perceive affinities and continuities within 20th century literature and other earlier periods.

C8.

Determine how literary texts are impacted by a scientific literary theory, perceive affinities and continuities among the different literary schools, determine the quality of literature and literary theory in their ability to convey the traditional literary values of form, meaning and symbolism, determine the applicable value of literary theory as an interpretive mode of criticism that probes how we read, make sense of experience, and produce meaning.

C9.

Write about novels and plays using postcolonial and feminist theories.

 

 

D. Transferable Skills

Upon successful completion of the program students will have:

D1.

Enrichment of thought and knowledge, enrichment of language expressions and vocabulary often seen in poetry, and have a better insight and appreciation of poetry in general.

D2.

Ability to interpret and analyze literary works, skills of thoughtful, organized group discussion, the ability to use texts to support literary analysis, and improved critical writing skills.

D3.

The ability to note significant details in literary texts, cite evidence to prove a point, compare and contrast literary texts, read for enjoyment, and expand the vocabulary.

D4.

The ability to relate to human situations depicted in fiction, develop a global perspective on art and life, and appreciate cultural, racial and ethnic diversity.

D5.

The ability to appreciate writers’ creations and insights.

D6.

The ability to use and apply various schools of critical theory, tackling difficult literary texts and language, discussing ideas in a group in an open, organic and thoughtful manner and improving critical writing skills.

D7.

The ability to appreciate literary texts and theories: their intellectual, moral and aesthetic features, the relationships among stylistic devices, central motif, organic structure, and the effectiveness of revealing and communicating the author’s and reader’s purpose, motivation, imagination and psychology.

D8.

The ability to use and apply postcolonial and feminist theories, perform literary analysis and interpretation, and improve critical writing skills, especially in essay form using research and MLA documentation style.

 


Linguistics and Translation

 

A. Knowledge & Understanding

Upon successful completion of the program students will be able to:

A1.

Understand that language is structured and the internal structure of language can be investigated at many different levels, e.g. word level, phrase level, sentence level …etc, understand the basic units of grammatical description, and understand ways of differentiating among different categories.

A2.

Adequately understand the basic concepts of linguistic and/or translation theory and show familiarity with some of the theoretical constructs devised to analyze the different components. Have a working knowledge of the different linguistic components.

A3.

Demonstrate good understanding of the basic terms used in phonetic description, demonstrate adequate understanding of how speech is produced and the different speech organs responsible for the production process, understand the differences between consonantal and vocalic sounds in terms of production and description phonetically transcribe speech and read transcribed passages, and be familiar with phonological/allophonic rules.

A4.

Follow-up work on grammatical categories and functions. Develop ways of assigning lexical items to categories and functions.

A5.

Understand the differences between SL teaching and/or translation methods in terms of  the rationales behind these methods, learn what it takes to be a teacher, and have a chance to see language problems from the perspective of the teacher, in the process of working on their own language problems.

A6.

Demonstrate good understanding of the basic concepts of analyzing and/or translating discourse, demonstrate adequate appreciation of the subtleties of linguistic description in relation to sketches of discourse, appreciate and interpret different types of discourse critically and be familiar with the various theoretical constructs devised to analyze discourse.

A7.

Demonstrate good understanding of the basic concepts of sociolinguistics; both macro-sociolinguistics and micro-sociolinguistics and have a good knowledge of the stylistic differences of speech and translation.

A8.

Know that languages are not only different but also similar and be able to see and understand the similarities, and the differences, between languages. Realize that a learner of a second or foreign language develops a number of interlanguages that are different from the target language and how these compare and contrast in terms of an error analysis. Diagnose, classify and correct errors in second/foreign language learning.

A9.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of some theoretical issues in language and linguistics both the internal structure of language and the varied uses of language in human life.

 

 

B. Intellectual Skills

Upon successful completion of the program students will be able to:

B1.

Recognize that language is structured out of units at many different levels. Develop the ability to recognize and differentiate the many types of categories and within each unit of linguistic description. Be able to recognize its characterizing features and its internal structure.

B2.

Differentiate among the different aspects of linguistics and recognize what area of linguistics a particular problem or issue belongs to or touches upon.

B3.

Phonetically describe speech sounds whether consonantal or vocalic. Understand allophonic rules and be able to recognize which phonological rule is at work in a given environment.

B4.

Analyze a stretch of discourse through its language in terms of both form and substance. Discriminate between the formal aspects of a piece of discourse and the non-formal aspects of discourse and demonstrate understanding of how either contributes to one’s understanding of the relevant text.

B5.

Appreciate the role of Universal Grammar rules, develop the skill of syntactic argumentation and be familiar with formal linguistics.

B6.

Analyze SL teaching situations according to well-defined procedures. Deal with language errors in a positive way (as natural steps in the learning process), without getting emotionally involved. Differentiate between current SL methodology and its history.

B7.

Recognize the different aspects of sociolinguistics. Recognize the relationship between language and such variables as culture, sex, gender, etc. in interpreting and translating a text

B8.

Spot and analyze the errors in second/foreign language learning; structure and carry out an error analysis.

 

 

C. Subject-Specific Skills

Upon successful completion of the program students will be able to:

C1.

Recognize and understand the concept of structure, recognize grammatical categories and be able to differentiate those on principled grounds and develop the ability to differentiate within each unit of linguistic description the many types that exist.

C2.

Perform basic exercises in phonology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics.

C3.

Understand how formal links contribute to the overall meaning, interpretation and/or translation of the text, understand how form underdetermines the overall meaning of the text, and understand how pragmatic knowledge plays a role in the overall meaning and interpretation of a text.

C4.

Practice innovations in phrase-structure trees, employ Checking Theory as a rigorous method of checking grammaticality and apply UG rules and constraints for grammaticality judgment.

C5.

Teach a lesson according to some modern SL teaching method, evaluate other teaching personnel’s performance, and be able to initiate activities that will result in increased teacher-student and student-student interactions.

C6.

Perform basic exercises in sociolinguistics and provide examples of the various aspects of linguistic variation.

C7.

Spot and analyze the errors in second/foreign language learning and be able to structure and carry out an error analysis.

 

D. Transferable Skills

Upon successful completion of the program students will have:

D1.

The ability to recognize the underlying language structure and to code and decode language

D2.

The ability to recognize and understand different aspects of linguistic theory, build up a technical vocabulary that allows them to read critically.

D3.

The ability to view discourse critically, recognize the different types of discourse, and build up a vocabulary that allows them to read critically and for enjoyment.

D4.

The ability to relate syntactic information to first language and second language acquisition, contrast formal linguistics with variationist linguistics, and use syntactic facts as background for work in discourse analysis.

D5.

The ability to apply ESL methods to teaching other languages such as ASL (Arabic as a second language), ISL (Italian as a second language), use the knowledge and skills obtained to improve their ability to learn foreign languages other than English, and appreciate the relevance of linguistic theory to practical matters.

D6.

Recognition and understanding of various aspects of sociolinguistics and the ability to develop a technical vocabulary which allows them to read critically and translate professionally

D7.

The ability to transfer the skills acquired in analyzing errors in learning English as a second/foreign language to analyzing errors committed by foreign learners of their own mother tongue.

 


Language

 

A. Knowledge & Understanding

Upon successful completion of the program students will:

A1.

Be acquainted with the basics in terms of the four major skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening through intensive and continuous exposure to the English language.

A2.

Deal with basic concepts of English grammar and relate them to real situations where tense, prepositions, singular, plural, clauses, etc, may be seen in action.

A3.

Use narration, description, analysis or a mixture of more than one mode of writing in paragraphs. Develop and organize ideas in a paragraph using different kinds of development strategies to develop the topic sentence. Write sentences with minimal errors. Use different kinds of editing strategies to edit and correct paragraphs.

A4.

Demonstrate knowledge of how to write a multi-paragraph essay which contains an introduction with a thesis statement, body paragraphs with adequate supporting details and transitions, and an appropriate conclusion. Develop and organize ideas in a paragraph using different types of support to develop the thesis statement. Write sentences with minimal errors in grammar. Use different kinds of editing strategies to edit and correct paragraphs and essays.

A5.

Be acquainted with the logical steps necessary for creating a finished essay developed through description, exemplification, classification, comparison and contrast, definition, argumentation, cause and effect and logical division. Be fully acquainted with the techniques of research writing.

A6.

Improve their writing skills and develop their own style and be able to practice creative writing such as short stories, short poems and critical writing.

 

 

B. Intellectual Skills

Upon successful completion of the program students will be able to:

B1.

Develop language-learning strategies, such as predicting and identifying main ideas and details.

B2.

Present contrasting viewpoints to reveal the understanding of the content while building language skills.

B3.

Express opinions in speaking and writing.

B4.

Skim and scan different essays to get the main idea, differentiate between main ideas and supporting ones, and differentiate between good writers and mediocre ones.

B5.

Synthesize information.

B6.

React to the different viewpoints in the reading and listening selections.

B7.

Compare sources of news, recognize assumptions about media, infer information not explicit in the interview, hypothesize other's point of view and analyze goals of news reporting.

B8.

Identify personal obstacles, rank the value of personal qualities, analyze narrative techniques in an essay, analyze sensitive language referring to disabilities, infer meaning not explicit in the text, compare and contrast two life histories and frame contrasting points of view on disability issues.

B9.

Interpret a cartoon, interpret a quotation, compare and contrast,

hypothesize scenarios, draw conclusions, propose solutions to problems and analyze a case.

B10.

Use context clues to guess meaning, analyze a speaker's emotions, infer word meaning from context, hypothesize another's point of view, make judgments and support opinions with information from the reports

 

 

 

C. Subject-Specific Skills

Upon successful completion of the program students will be able to:

C1.

Integrate the study of grammar with related vocabulary and cultural information.

C2.

Develop accuracy in speaking or writing about a topic.

C3.

Apply the language, grammar, style and content they’ve learned.

C4.

Write stimulating, informative and creative passages to ensure greater language proficiency.

C5.

Write convincing and coherent essays by using a variety of rhetorical modes and be able to comprehend and write an essay.

C6.

Reduce and contract auxiliary verbs

C7.

Be familiar with context clues, synonyms, idiomatic expressions, descriptive adjectives, dictionary work, word definitions, word forms and figurative language.

 

 

D. Transferable Skills

Upon successful completion of the program students will:

D1.

Write sentences and paragraphs with minimal errors in grammar, punctuation and spelling.

D2.

Improve their writing skills using a variety of rhetoric such as descriptive, argumentative, cause and effect, analytic; develop their active reading and comprehension skills, and improve their critical and thinking skills.

D3.

Expand the vocabulary and pronunciation practice.

D4.

Expand writing by going through the process of prewriting, organizing, revising and editing.

D5.

Perform challenging and imaginative speaking activities writing topics and research assignments.

D6.

Have confidence and competence in using English.

D7.

Listen for main ideas, listen for details, provide evidence to support answers,

relate listening to personal values, synthesize information from both listenings, listen to student broadcasts and analyze them, and evaluate a TV news program.

D8.

Summarize main ideas, listen for details, relate listening to knowledge of the world, identifying connecting themes between two listening(s), identify thought groups in speech, watch and analyze a movie, and listen to classmates' reports and pose questions.

D9.

Converse with a classmate and take notes, summarize main ideas, listen for details, interpret speaker's tone and emotions, relate listening to personal experiences, compare information from two listening(s) and identify emphasis in speech and its meaning.

D10.

Listen to a report with static interference, relate previous knowledge to listening, identify chronology in a report, identify a speaker's emotions

Summarize main ideas, listen for specific information, identify intonation patterns in speech, listen to student reports and take notes and watch a disaster movie and take notes.

D11.

Make predictions, summarize points, act out a scripted conversation, give a newscast, express and defend opinions and interview a news specialist.

D12.

Make predictions, construct and perform a dialogue, practice using synonyms, parallelism, and prepositional phrases to enrich a narrative, plan and give a three-minute speech and orally summarize research on overcoming obstacles.

D13.

Make predictions, use  new vocabulary in a guided conversation, make contrastive statements using appropriate intonation, act out scripted dialogues, interrupt politely to clarify or confirm information, role-play a meeting, conduct a survey and report results and report survey results to the class.

D14.

Make predictions, share personal experiences and fears, construct and perform a dialogue, express surprise, shock, and interest in news, present an emergency weather report, conduct an interview and present a movie review.

 


Student Progression and Achievement

Student achievement, monitored through sound assessment process, is the heart of education programs. Admissions and placement practices, measurement or assessment practices for level-to-level are harmonious with:

  1. Placement practices and curricular objectives and intended learning outcomes
  2. Stated learning outcomes
  3. Written proficiency scales
  4. RUBERIC

In documenting the student progress, the program is expected to use instruments that meet the norms of good practice such as standardized tests and comprehensive exams, portfolios, rubrics, oral presentations and evaluated performances. Assessment of students' achievement and competency demonstrate that AUM’s students have the knowledge, skills and competencies consistent with institutional goals.

The faculty has a clear position on the nature of quality teaching and learning with a commitment to student centered learning and assessment practices, flexible teaching strategies which emphasize student management of learning. Resources to support teaching and learning are managed as an institutional responsibility. Also applied are communication technologies.

It espouses not only the development of academic skills but also the development of personal and interpersonal competencies. It is caring, supportive and with high academic and personal expectations for each student to achieve a full and productive life. The Faculty and staff members in this Department are available to help students define and achieve their personal, social, educational and career goals.

Strategies adopted for academic advising are constantly updated and modified. This is carried out every semester through experienced staff and in accordance with a prior suggested plan by the Department. Students are distributed among groups and supervised right at the beginning of registration. Periodic sessions are held from time to time to pursue academic advising.

Program evaluation is constantly updated. Study plans for B.A. are constantly revised. New courses are added or incorporated with other courses. Prerequisites are also constantly revised and modified. Course assessment procedures are also updated to get better feedback. Questionnaires related to this assessment are under study, revision and updating. Some items are deleted and new items are added. These new items are added in line with new concepts and benchmarking adopted. Thus, revision is extended to involve graduated students follow up, and senior   students ' Exit (Achievement/Competency) Exam.

Methodology used is also under development in light of the modern techniques used in teaching and on the effect of linguistic theories, communication, and computer assisted language learning.

The whole curriculum is developed in the light of the modification taking place in quality assurance, linguistic theories, communication, benchmarking, and electronic technology. The whole assessment and development process takes place to achieve the Department's mission statement and objectives. 

A system for the Student Progression and Achievement will be developed in the near future.  This is a robust system used to monitor the student progression from semester to semester until graduation through the creation and updating of student profile. It includes procedures for:

  • Student Absence Procedure
  • Academic Supervision Procedure
  • Induction for Newly Registered Students Procedure
  • Student Profile Procedure
  • Student Council Procedure
  • Third parties offering services to students
  • Career Counseling Unit
  • Alumni Service Unit

The Student Affairs Committee intends to collate the relevant questionnaires, and derives statistical analysis of them before reporting results and reviewing its process in a Review.

 

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